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Albert Gottschalk

2,944$
Albert Gottschalk - 1866-1906. Sketch / preliminary drawing. Landscape, 'Bro over å' (Bridge over the river). Oil on canvas. Unsigned. Registered in "Troels Andersen", no. 39.

Andy Warhol, Sixty Last Suppers (1986)

160,000$
Warhol’s massive Sixty Last Suppers shows 60 black-and-white renderings of Leonardo da Vinci’s famous depiction of Jesus Christ’s last meal. The work, offered at Christie’s New York evening sale of post-war and contemporary art in November, was estimated at $53 million. It hammered after a relatively brief barrage of bids at $56 million, or $60.8 million with fees—approximately $1 million per Last Supper.

Carl Fischer. Motif From France . Oil On Canvas

3,562$
Painting by Carl Fischer (1887 - 1962), signed. Oil on canvas. br> Man standing next to bench, France approx. 1930. Original silver frame. Front glass-mounted (this is removable).

Carl-Henning Pedersen, (“Red Wing Horse”) “Rød Vinge Hest”

26,236$
Painting by Cobra artist Carl-Henning Pedersen (1913 - 2007). Title: "Rød vinge hest" ("Red wing horse") Signed on the back.

Constantin Brancusi, La muse endormie (1913)

57,000$
La muse endormie, a bronze egg-shaped sculpture of a head whose partially gilded surface has a matte, mottled effect, in contrast to Brancusi’s well-known sleek and polished bronzes, handily beat its estimate between $25 million and $35 million. It sold for $57.3 million at Christie’s Impressionist and Modern evening sale in May and set a new record for the artist. The auction house’s website indicated that this lot was secured with a third-party guarantee, the late addition of which likely raised the estimate from its initial $20 million to $30 million that had been indicated in the printed auction catalogue.

Cy Twombly, Leda and the Swan (1962)

52,000$
At Christie’s New York evening sale of post-war and contemporary art that took place in May, Twombly’s energetic, large-scale canvas Leda and the Swan climbed from the low $30 millions up to a $47 million hammer price, or $52.8 million with the buyer’s premium, a result squarely within its estimate of between $35 million and $55 million. Painted during the artist’s years in Rome, the work appeared on sale for the first time in 30 years.

Edvard Weie Bust Painting

87,348$
Painting by the artist Edvard Weie (1879-1943). Oil on canvas, painted in 'bust style' (head and shoulders), c.1915.

Egill Jacobsen Painting

13,460$
Egill Jacobsen 1910-1998. Untitled painting. Signed and dated on the reverse: E.J. 63 Egill Jacobsen, Danish Cobra artist and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts Copenhagen.

Eugéne De Sala, Still Life With Flowers And Fruit

1,980$
Eugene de Sala, (1899 - 1989). 'The art rebel who introduced surrealism to Denmark'. Still Life With Flowers and Fruit. Signed: de sala. Ca. 1925-1930. Oil on masonite

Eugéne De Sala. Composition

3,562$
Eugene de Sala, (1899 - 1989). 'The art rebel who introduced surrealism to Denmark'. Still Life With Flowers and Books. Signed: de sala. Ca. 1930. Oil on masonite

Fernand Léger, Contraste de formes (1913)

70,000$
Like the van Gogh painting, Léger’s Contraste de formes also went up for sale without a guarantee in New York’s November sale at Christie’s, following an embarrassment at the house’s early October London sale when a star lot, a 1971 Francis Bacon painting, failed to reach its reserve and went unsold in the absence of a guarantee. Léger’s canvas, painted at a pivotal moment in the artist’s career, not only sold for $70 million, but smashed the record for the artist, previously set at $39.2 million by La femme en bleu (study) (1912–13) at a 2008 sale at Sotheby’s in New York.

Francis Bacon, Three Studies for a Portrait of George Dyer (1963)

17,000$
Bacon’s triptych had once belonged to famed children’s books author Roald Dahl before passing to the seller who put it on the market at Christie’s this May, where it sold for a total $51.7 million, or $46 million before the buyer’s premium. That fell short of the work’s estimate, provided on request, in excess of $50 million. The portrait was the first painted of Bacon’s lover and muse, who according to (a likely false) legend met the artist while attempting a break-in of his studio.